ACADEMICS Comparative Religion & Philoso
ACADEMICS Comparative Religion & Philoso
ACADEMICS Comparative Religion & Philoso
ACADEMICS Comparative Religion & Philoso

SCHOOL OF COMPARATIVE RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY

Comparative Religion and Philosophy Programs    

  • Master of Arts in Comparative Religion and Philosophy

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Comparative Religion and Philosophy

Mission and Purpose

The Comparative Religion and Philosophy department is dedicated to the following goals:  (i) to examine the influence and contributions of environment and culture to divergences in orientation, philosophy, and doctrine among world religions; (ii) to foster a high level of scholarship concerning the study of religion and spiritual inquiry as a personal and socio-cultural phenomenon; (iii) to encourage personal practices and provide meditation training for students so that religious scholarship does not result in a spiritually indifferent or disaffected person; (iv) to promote thought in the direction of global consciousness which addresses humankind's perennial spiritual longings without simultaneously creating religious dogma and intolerance -- an outcome which history reveals as the dark side of religious passion. Graduate study in comparative religion and philosophy is the academic and practical discipline of spiritual scholarship and inquiry.

  • Master of Arts Degree Program in Comparative Religion and Philosophy: Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution.

  • Doctor of Philosophy Degree Program in Comparative Religion and Philosophy: Master's degree from an accredited institution.

Learning Objectives

The M.A. curriculum is designed to provide scholarly training in the comparative and historical study of religion, in-depth examination of particular religions that have had major influences on human history, as well as providing expert guidance and instruction in spiritual practices and inquiry (e.g. CRP504/704 Spiritual Education). The M.A. program is a stand-alone program, yet at the same time it provides invaluable educational preparation for the Institute's Ph.D. program in Comparative Religion and Philosophy.

Comparative Religion and Philosophy Masters PLOs.  Graduates of CIHS CRP Masters program will be able to:

  • PLO 1: Explain multiple religious traditions and cultures in their specific historical, philosophical, psychological, ethical and cultural contexts. Sources may include texts, practices, beliefs and material culture.

  • PLO 2: Apply equitable practices of dialogue, learning, and research that respect the sacred wisdom of each religion, spiritual expression and indigenous tradition. Within this process, it is expected that students engage in critical self-reflection about one’s own culture-bound perceptions, assumptions, and experiences, including the effects of privilege and oppression.

  • PLO 3: Apply research methods appropriate to the field of comparative religion.

  • PLO 4: Understand the correlations between spirituality and both mental and physical wellness, and the way that spirituality intersects with integral health and psychology to create existential coherence.

  • PLO 5: Understand “religion” and “spirituality” in the context of our existence within a contemporary global society, consider the challenges posed in developing a global ethic and a pluralistic society, and describe potential resolutions of these challenges through compassionate social engagement.

Degree Requirements

Fifty-six (56) graduate quarter units are required to complete the M.A. degree program in Comparative Religion and Philosophy. The curriculum consists of 8 required core courses. Students with strong backgrounds in one or more equivalent courses may select alternative courses from other programs, at the discretion of the program director.

Core courses                                       32 units

Electives                                               24 units

TOTAL                                                  56 units

Core Curriculum

Courses

  • CRP 500 Academic Writing Within the Human Sciences (4 units)

  • CRP 501 Foundations in Integral Studies (4 units)

  • CRP 502 Consciousness Studies (4 units)

  • CRP 503 Counseling & Communication Skills (4 units)

  • CRP 504 Spiritual Education (several options available) (4 units)

  • CRP 613 Introduction to Quantitative and Qualitative Research (4 units)

  • CRP 615 Study of Eastern and Western Religions: Philosophy and Ethics (4 units)

  • CRP 618 Study of Eastern and Western Religions: Metaphysics and Healing (4 units)

Spiritual education units are required for all students. CIHS teaches that humans consist of body, mind, and spirit. Spirit is always the most essential aspect to be cultivated as the body and mind connection ceases after death. The spirit (soul) exists beyond material time and space until spirit (soul) transcends individual ego to reach Superconsciousness, the unification of the individual with the sacred, and, ultimately, with God.

Spirit (superconsciousness) involves extrasensory perception and intuitive understanding (Divine wisdom) of the essence of matter and phenomena, as well as creativity. These qualities are supported by a love that encompasses all. Persons who awaken to spirit and those who have not awakened but live according to their own spirit (true self) and are able to live in harmony with others and nature. To inspire students to understand and live according to this principle is the main purpose of CIHS and underlies the pursuit of spiritual inquiry at the Institute.

Students may choose courses from this list.  Additional courses may be approved to satisfy this requirement. Please check with your Program Director.

Courses

  • Meridian Exercises (How to activate Chi energy and obtain a healthy body and mind (2 units)

  • Breathing Exercises (pranayama) (2 units)

  • Karma and Reincarnation and the Survival of Consciousness (4 units)

  • Awakening Chakras and attaining spiritual evolution (2 units)

  • Toward a Superconsciousness (4 units)

  • Pranic Healing (4 units)

  • Psychology of the Chakras (4 units)

  • Perspectives of the Afterlife (4 units)

  • Consciousness Based Medicine (4 units)

  • Motoyama Philosophy and Practice (4 units)

  • Psychospiritual Healing Practices (4 units)

  • Dying Consciously (4 units)

Electives

Courses

  • CRP 620 Shamanism and Indigenous Religions (4 units)

  • CRP 623 Buddhism (4 units)

  • CRP 624 Christian Mysticism (4 units)

  • CRP 625 Islam (4 units)

  • CRP 626 Judaism (4 units)

  • CRP 627 Hinduism (4 units)

  • CRP 628 Taoism (4 units)

  • CRP 680 Topics of Special Interest (4 units)

  • CRP 690 Thesis (4 units)

  • CRP 699 Independent Study (4 units)

Learning Objectives

The aim of the Ph.D. Program in Comparative Religion and Philosophy is to provide advanced coursework in a scholarly study of religion; to advance training in spiritual practices; to foster relevant research; and additionally, to offer opportunities for elective coursework in other departments which can enhance the student's overall understanding of the discipline of spiritual practice and inquiry.

Program learning Outcomes

Comparative Religion and Philosophy Ph.D. PLOs.  Graduates of CIHS CRP Ph.D. program will be able to:

  • PLO 1: Evaluate multiple religious traditions and cultures in their specific historical, philosophical, psychological, ethical and cultural contexts. Sources may include texts, practices, beliefs and material culture.

  • PLO 2: Apply and critique equitable practices of dialogue, learning, and research that respect the sacred wisdom of each religion, spiritual expression and indigenous tradition. Within this process, it is expected that students engage in critical self-reflection about one’s own culture-bound perceptions, assumptions, and experiences, including the effects of privilege and oppression.

  • PLO 3: Investigate and apply research methods appropriate to the field of comparative religion.

  • PLO 4: Analyze and evaluate the correlations between spirituality and both mental and physical wellness, and the way that spirituality intersects with integral health and psychology to create existential coherence.

  • PLO 5: Examine “religion” and “spirituality” in the context of our existence within a contemporary global society, evaluate the challenges posed in developing a global ethic and a pluralistic society, and formulate potential resolutions of these challenges through compassionate social engagement.

Degree Requirements

The Doctor of Philosophy in Comparative Religion and Philosophy requires ninety-four (94) graduate quarter units, 72 units of course work including seven core courses (36 units), and 22 units of Dissertation sequence.  Core course units completed at the Masters level do not have to be repeated, and they may be applied toward the Doctoral course requirements to a maximum of 16 quarter units, except the Spiritual Education requirement is to be fulfilled at both Masters and Doctoral level.  Elective course units, beyond the core courses, may be completed by drawing upon the Comparative Religion and Philosophy electives and from the Institute’s other programs.

Advancement to Candidacy is a formal step in the Ph.D. program. Eligibility for the Advancement to Candidacy examination consists of successful completion of all coursework (68 units) except CRP 896, CRP 897, and two research-based papers prior (or concurrent to) enrollment in the first of the Dissertation sequence. Please see Advancement to Candidacy, (p. 37).

 

Core courses                                       32 units

Electives                                               24 units

TOTAL                                                  94 units

Courses

  • CRP 700 Academic Writing Within the Human Sciences (4 units)

  • CRP 701 Foundations in Integral Studies (4 units)

  • CRP 702 Consciousness Studies (4 units)

  • CRP 703 Counseling & Communication Skills (4 units)

  • CRP 704 Spiritual Education (several options available) (4 units)

  • CRP 743 Advanced Qualitative Research Methods (4 units)

  • CRP 706 Advanced Quantitative Research Methods (4 units)

  • CRP 715 Study of Eastern and Western Religions: Philosophy and Ethics (4 units)

  • CRP 718 Study of Eastern and Western Religions: Metaphysics and Healing (4 units)

  • CRP 730 Religion, Spirituality, and the Global Society: Foundations and Methods (4 units)

  • CRP 896 Dissertation Topic Research (5 units)

  • CRP 897 Dissertation Methodology Review (5 units)

  • CRP 898A Dissertation I (6 units)

  • CRP 898B Dissertation II (6 units)

 

*See catalog for prerequisites

  • CRP 720 Shamanism and Indigenous Religions (4 units)

  • CRP 723 Buddhism (4 units)

  • CRP 724 Christian Mysticism (4 units)

  • CRP 725 Islam (4 units)

  • CRP 726 Judaism (4 units)

  • CRP 727 Hinduism (4 units)

  • CRP 728 Taoism (4 units)

  • CRP 729 Mysticism (4 units)

  • CRP 731 Karma, Reincarnation and Survival of Consciousness (4 units)

  • CRP 745 Integral Spiritual Coaching (4 units)

  • CRP 764 Spiritual & Transpersonal Psychology (4 units)

  • CRP 790 Topics of Special Interest (2-4 units)

  • CRP 799 Independent Study (4 units)

CIHS Logo
  • Instagram
  • CIHS Facebook
  • LinkedIn Social Icon

701 Garden View Court, Encinitas, CA 92024       info@cihs.edu |   760-634-1771

CIHS Apply Now Link

@2020 California Institute for Human Science