• This course provides a comprehensive overview of the various theories of counseling and psychotherapy. This course is designed to critically examine the historical/theoretical frameworks that the major forms of counseling utilize. Some of the theoretical perspectives will include: (but are not limited to) Psychodynamic, Person-Centered (Humanistic), Existential, Adlerian, Behavioral, Cognitive-Behavioral, Gestalt, Multimodal, and Systems theory.

  • Diagnosis in psychology is based on the most current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) that sets the criteria for diagnosis in the field. Clinical licensing and practice requires a thorough knowledge of the categories and criteria for diagnosing mental disorders. The course provides students with an understanding of psychodiagnosis that will prepare them for clinical licensing. Consideration will be given to the limitations of specific diagnostic categories as part of a deliberate effort to medicalize what it is that psychiatry treats, and the implications for the therapeutic relationship.

  • This course is designed to educate students in a life coaching process that assists clients in integrating their spiritual nature into every aspect of their life. Professionals working from this perspective bring authenticity to their work by integrating their own spiritual nature into their daily personal and professional life. Therefore, this course will not only be informative, but necessarily experiential as well.

  • The complex experimental and correlational designs available in behavioral and health related research, particularly in relation to multivariate analysis, are reviewed presented with examples. The roles of control groups, randomization, and matching are discussed in relation to complex designs using multiple groups and repeated measures. Types of randomization are discussed. The importance of validity, reliability, sensitivity, and specificity are covered as well as types of error. Multifactorial analysis and use of multivariate data analysis programs.

  • This course entails an experiential study of approaches to the alteration of human mood and states of consciousness by modifying rhythm, frequency, pitch, and intonation of sound produced by electronic and acoustic sources. The concepts and application of Mantra chanting and of music therapy are discussed.

  • The central question addressed in this course is: How do (and if they do) mind (consciousness) and body (matter) interact? We will cover much of the following, depending on level of participants: The “hard problem” of consciousness, David Chalmers’ supervenience and zombies; Overview of philosophical theories of mind; Panpsychism in the west, including the role of AQAL integral and Wilberian theory, Whitehead’s process theory, Motoyama’s superconsciousness, and Bhaskar’s MetaReality; Attempts at scientific theories of mind; Focus on the question whether the physical universe causally closed; The quantum measurement problem, the encounter of quantum physics with consciousness; and transrational perspectives.

  • In this course, paradigms of health and disease are comparatively explored, from the origins of medical traditions and lineages to complementary and alternative approaches to healing. Approaches considered include ancient Greek and Egyptian traditions, ethnomedicine, the foundations of Eastern medical approaches based on Ayurvedic, Taoist, Tibetan, and Chinese medicine, and holistic approaches to healing including subtle, vibrational, and energy medicine

  • This course examines the chakra system from the perspective of their effect on the four archetypes of the whole human being: mental, physical, spiritual, and emotional. In this manner, the class will be a healing and clearing journey through the chakras, in which the student will utilize the dichotomous chakra archetypes as one of several self-healing tools. Chakras are transformers of energy, but they are also transformers of consciousness into the physical dimension. The chakras are also examined as to their particular dominance in a person’s life: a given chakra may be more prevalent in an individual’s life and therefore affects the way in which one perceives reality. 

  • Eastern religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism teach the theory of reincarnation based on karma on the premise that reincarnation aims to encourage spiritual growth. Karma refers to a cause-effect relationship: every action is a cause that produces an effect, and hence attachment to the physical dimension. There are references in the esoteric Christian traditions such as the Gnosticism and in the Gospel of Matthew. * Fulfills CIHS spiritual education requirement.

  • Sociocultural Psychology examines cultural, psychological, political, religious, and also ecological factors that play a role in how people perceive self, other and environment. The course will address the scope of increasing awareness of indigenous cultures and practices to the rise of social networks and the influences of modern technologies.The course will also explore various paradigms such as human systems theory, Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory, including the microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, macrosystem, and chronosystem and Social Construction theory. This is a crucial course for all programs and students, especially those who seek a private practice, given the increasing numbers of migrations and the fact that we live in a multicultural world. ** For all psychology students, this course is highly recommended for licensure.