• The course draws upon investigations and models concerning the nature, types, and levels of consciousness, drawn from various religious traditions, yoga, mysticism, spirituality, shamanism, Jungian psychology, and parapsychology. It also explores the nature of transcendent consciousness, or super consciousness from spiritual traditions, as well as the practices used in the various traditions to attain these states.

  • The course draws upon investigations and models concerning the nature, types, and levels of consciousness, drawn from various religious traditions, yoga, mysticism, spirituality, shamanism, Jungian psychology, and parapsychology. It also explores the nature of transcendent consciousness, or super consciousness from spiritual traditions, as well as the practices used in the various traditions to attain these states.

    This class will be collaborative. Instead of uniform midterm and final exams, and weekly papers on your readings, each student will make two presentations to classmates during the quarter. The presentations can be via Forum posts, in person presentations during on-campus classes (or via Skype), short papers, or uploads of audio or video recordings. Not to worry if you do not feel comfortable presenting, or are technologically challenged – papers are fine.

  • This course will explore several current and historical models of the human chakra system with particular emphasis on the evolutionary model described by Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama and awakening kundalini energy. The course will blend chakra theory and praxis to evoke poïesis, or the blossoming into form, of personal and planetary evolution. While the Psychology of Chakras course focuses on archetypes and cognitive stances, the Theories of Chakras course focuses on scientific and spiritual aspects of the chakras. This course is appropriate for all Comparative Religion and Philosophy and Integral Health students.


  • The broad range of complementary and alternative approaches to healing modalities is surveyed within the context of an integral understanding of human beings in their environment. Historical and cultural aspects of complementary healing are discussed, as well as evidence-based alternative therapies. Therapies focusing on the mind, body, and spirit are addressed including manual and biofield therapies as well as vibratory therapies. Alternative western therapies, Asian modalities, and methods from indigenous cultures are studied. Additionally, integral psychology modalities are discussed which address psychological issues and trauma. This course is applicable to all programs whether integral health, psychology, or even as an elective with comparative religion and philosophy. The impact of Complementary Medicine/Methods is broad and it is useful knowledge to have in your toolbox as a clinician or researcher. This course will approach the subject matter through academic investigation/research with well-known foundational textbooks and practical application/exploration of various modalities/methods. It will have a large experiential component in addition to the academic work.


  • Ethical and legal issues in behavioral research with human subjects, counseling and psychotherapy, and psychological testing will be discussed. Issues pertaining to provision of clinical services are covered. Legal aspects of professional competence, behavior, licensing, confidentiality, informed consent, recruitment of subjects for research and advertising of services will be reviewed.

  • The course reviews the varied attitudes and values as regards human sexuality and many cultural myths surrounding sexual practices as well alternate lifestyles. Basic knowledge about sexual health and associated physical and emotional issues will be explored, along with types of dysfunction and problems encountered in counseling situations including DSM categories and sociocultural considerations. Current therapeutic concepts and interventions will also be presented.

  • This course examines the role of Eastern, Middle-Eastern and Western breathing practices for physical, emotional and mental health as well as spiritual development. We will cover; Eastern traditions include Yogic-Vedic, Buddhist, Taoist and Martial arts. Western traditions include rebirthing Bioenergetics, Stanislav Grof’s Holotropic Breathworth and more. Middle Eastern traditions include early Christian Aramaic practices, Kabalah and Sufi practices as well. At a time when economic, environmental and personal stress are increasing, it is important to recognize the value of breath as a means of significant healing The course also examples problems that occur with improper breathing patterns and unsupervised practices.

  • The Study of Eastern and Western Religions: Metaphysics and Healing. This course focuses on selected esoteric teachings and healing practices among the major Eastern and Western religious traditions.

  • The two main methodologies will be reviewed: first, qualitative research, based on phenomenology, explores the nature and meaning of phenomena using interviews, observation, or records. The approach is inductive and hermeneutic and aims to develop concepts or theories focusing on the subject’s experience.

    Quantitative research is essentially deductive and confirms hypotheses using statistical analysis. It issued mostly in experimental and correlation designs to establish relationships between variables. It is a traditional model of evaluating studies based on statistics. Steps in the research process for both approaches will be reviewed, focusing on sampling, collection, and analysis of data.