Course Schedule


Fall Quarter 2017

September 25 ~ December 2, 2017

Registration Week: September 11-15, 2017

Holidays: Columbus Day 10/9, Veteran’s Day 11/10, Thanksgiving Day 11/22-24

 

Course#

Course Title

Faculty

Units (BA)

Start Date

Day & Time

PSY/IH/CRP 680/790

LP 530/730

BIS 208

 

On Campus

Pranic Healing

 

Clark 4 (5) 9/23 9/23 (Sat) & 9/24 (Sun) : 9 am – 5:30 pm

11/3 (Fri), 11/4 (Sat) : 9 am –9:30 pm

11/5 (Sun): 9 am –5:30 pm

 

PSY/IH/CRP 500/700

 

ILM

Academic Writing the Human Sciences

**Required for all MA and PhD students unless waived specifically by your course advisor.
*Required for all entering MA and PhD students.

 

Padma 4 9/28 Starts Tuesdays

9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24, 10/31, 11/7, 11/14, 11/21& 11/28

6:30 pm – 9pm

 

Meet weekly in person / via skype

 BIS 201

 

Online

Introduction to Integral Studies Burgess 5
9/28 Thursdays

9/28, 10/5, 10/12, 10/19, 10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, 11/23 & 11/30

Meeting TBD:  real time components to be determined – Students need to schedule a weekly Dialogue time with the Instructor

PSY/IH/LP/CRP 501/701
ILM
Foundations of Integral Studies

Required for all MA and PhD students

 

Brophy 4
9/27 Starts Thursday

6 pm, or to be adjusted in case of conflicts

PSY/IH/LP 505

 

Online

Introduction to Qualitative and Quantitative Research

MA program requirement.

Fauver 4 (5) 9/25 Mondays

9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20 & 11/27

Mondays through Saturdays online.  Most of it takes place in the students own time to check into and respond to discussion materials and watch videos, etc.

PSY 617/710

 

 

Online

Ethics and Law in Psychology

** Highly recommended for all licensure track Psychology Students

Mijares 4 (5) 9/25 Mondays

9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20 & 11/27

Mondays through Saturdays online.  Most of it takes place in the students own time to check into and respond to discussion materials and watch videos, etc.

PSY/IH 619/819

 

ILM

Psychotherapy Approaches and Strategies Goldsby 4 (5) 9/27 Wednesdays

9/27, (10/4), 10/11, (10/18), 10/25, (11/1),

11/8, (11/15), 11/22, and (11/29)

(on campus session starts 6 pm)

PSY/IH 608/708

BIS 308

 

ILM

 

Human Sexuality: Clinical Consideration Dexter 4 (5) 9/25 Mondays (on campus sessions will be held on the following dates) 6 -9:30 pm

9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20 & 11/27

Mondays through Saturdays online.  Most of it takes place in the students own time to check into and respond to discussion materials and watch videos, etc.

PSY/IH 610/717

 

Online

Psychopharmacology

 

*Psy licensure track recommended

Aganov 4 9/25 Mondays

9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20 & 11/27

Mondays through Saturdays online.  Most of it takes place in the students own time to check into and respond to discussion materials and watch videos, etc.

PSY 705

IH 706

LP 613/713

CRP 613/713

 

 

Online

Advanced Qualitative Research

Required for PhD students in Psychology & IH

*Research Methods for Religious Studies requirement.

 

Mijares 4 9/25 Mondays

9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20 & 11/27

Mondays through Saturdays online.  Most of it takes place in the students own time to check into and respond to discussion materials and watch videos, etc.

CRP 620/720

BIS 463

 

 

ILM

Shamanism Padma 4 9/25  Mondays

9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20 & 11/27

Meet weekly in person / via skype

6:30 pm – 9pm

 PSY/IH/LP/CRP 680/790

BIS 208

 

Online

Topic of Special Interest: Awareness and the Afterlife Burgess 4 9/28 Starts Thursday

9/28, 10/5, 10/12, 10/19, 10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16, 11/23 & 11/30

Meeting TBD:  real time components to be determined – Students need to schedule a weekly Dialogue time with the Instructor

PSY/IH/LP/CRP 680/790

BIS 208

 

Online

Topic of Special Interest: The Biofield

TBD

Rubik 4 9/25 Mondays

9/25, 10/2, 10/9, 10/16, 10/23, 10/30, 11/6, 11/13, 11/20 & 11/27

Mondays through Saturdays online.  Most of it takes place in the students own time to check into and respond to discussion materials and watch videos, etc.

 PSY/IH/LP/CRP 680/790

BIS 208

On Campus

Advance Concept in Pranic Healing

Prerequisite: *Pranic Healing

 Clark  2 (2.5)  12/1 12/1 (Fri) & 12/2 (Sat): 9 am – 9:30 pm

12/3 (Sun): 9 am – 5:30 pm

 

BIS 203

 

Senior Project 5
PSY/IH/LP/CRP 896

Dissertation Topic Research

Umansky,

Brophy, other committee members as determined.

5
PSY/IH/LP/CRP 897  Dissertation Methodology Review

Umansky,

Brophy, other committee members as determined.

5
PSY/IH/LP/CRP 898A

Dissertation I

Umansky,

Brophy, other committee members as determined.

6
PSY/IH/LP/CRP 898B Dissertation II

Umansky,

Brophy, other committee members as determined.

6
Class Day & Time: Class day means a student is scheduled to attend a class session, or students receiving instruction through the Internet.)

*Integrated Learning Modality (ILM) is a hybrid course on campus with some online components as determined by the professor that may include instruction, conference calls, class population population, and curriculum. Most ILM courses will be half or primarily on campus. Skyping/Video Conferencing is available for distance learning.

 

** Library Information Resource Network (LIRN) is a newly acquired comprehensive academic database for CIHS students. There will be a $10 a quarter fee. All articles, titles, abstracts, books, etc., are free of cost, including peer-reviewed articles.

 

Course Descriptions

 

*Pranic Healing

Pranic H is a comprehensive integrated energy based healing system that utilizes prana to facilitate the body’s innate ability to heal.  Participants will learn energy anatomy, energetic hygiene, skills to feel, control and apply prana, and specific prana colors for specific purposes to accelerate healing.  They will learn how to release crippling energetic patterns caused by stress, trauma, abuse and negative belief patterns.  In addition, they will learn self-healing, long-distance healing and Divine healing strategies.  Throughout the course participants will participate in experiential exercises with each other as well as with outside volunteers. Applications for professional and healthcare practices will be outlined.

 

Academic Writing the Human Sciences *Required for all entering MA and PhD students.

This first course upon embarking on a CIHS education is designed to provide an introduction to critical interpretation of scholarly research and academic writing, though the lens of human science history and systems. We will review the perspectives of human science including such pioneers as William James, Roberto Assagioli, Carl Jung, William Braud, Charles Tart, Candace Pert, Stanley Krippner, Ken Wilber, Roy Bhaskar and Dr. Motoyama. Through this course students will develop fluency in APA writing style, writing composition, and engagement with scholarly references.

 

Introduction to Integral Studies

This course introduces the vision and principles of Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama, which are the foundation of CIHS educational programs. Integral visions and practices are introduced, spanning religious studies, biology, physics, psychology, philosophy, and the evolving interplay between Western and Eastern paradigms. The course approaches the study of human existence from holistic perspectives that include body, mind and spirit and that foster the evolution of a harmonious global society. The complexities of creating an integral worldview based on the diversity of human thought and culture are explored.

 

Foundations in Integral Studies

This course embodies the vision and principles Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama articulated as the foundation of CIHS educational programs, at graduate and advanced levels.  Integral and meta-integral visions, theories and practices are introduced, including a transdisciplinary spanning of developmental psychology & philosophy, biology, physics, religious studies and a dynamic evolving interplay among Western and Eastern paradigms.  The project is to develop transperspectival awareness of human existence including holistic perspectives that include body, mind and spirit, and foster the evolution of a harmonious global society.  The complexities of creating an integral worldview based on the diversity of human thought and culture are introduced.

 

Introduction to Qualitative and Quantitative Research

The Research Methods course provides a brief introduction to various forms of research methods, both quantitative and qualitative. An overview is presented of the quantitative and qualitative research methods and designs applicable to the systematic analysis of the varieties of medical treatments and human experiences. Scientific problem-solving will be emphasized to include observational techniques and measurement tools, coding, analytic strategies, and reporting of research. The course will encourage students to focus on research that has been used in their fields of interest, and to develop a research proposal for a topic of their choice.

 

Ethics and Law in Psychology

Ethical and legal issues in behavioral research with human subjects, counseling and psychotherapy, and psychological testing will be discussed. Issues pertaining to provision of clinical services are covered. Legal aspects of professional competence, behavior, licensing, confidentiality, informed consent, recruitment of subjects for research and advertising of services will be reviewed. (4 units)

 

Psychotherapy Approaches and Strategies

Many presentations of psychotherapy are based on the major theoretical orientations of the three main categories of therapy: psychodynamic, mainly derived from psychoanalytic thought; experiential relational which stresses subjective feelings; and cognitive and behavioral approaches that emphasize the role of thinking and being. These general models have many commonalities and areas of overlap. The course will discuss the underlying assumptions and strategies of these and other approaches to therapy.

 

Human Sexuality: Clinical Consideration

The course reviews the varied attitudes and values as regards human sexuality and many cultural myths surrounding sexual practices as well alternate lifestyles. Basic knowledge about sexual health and associated physical and emotional issues will be explored, along with types of dysfunction and problems encountered in counseling situations including DSM categories and sociocultural considerations. Current therapeutic concepts and interventions will also be presented.

 

Shamanism

We are all indigenous members of our earth community as our ancestors sprung from ancient cultures of all continents. Therefore, there is much to be learned from native, traditional, and indigenous peoples of ancient and contemporary times. Shamans have been known to self-regulate their attention and awareness for millennia and have provided a legacy worth of serious academic study in psychospiritual methods, symbols, processes, and as a context for healing. Students will study the wisdom of their own ancestral lineage, and compare and contrast this with an indigenous culture of their choice. Lecture and experiential exercises, rituals, and other methods used in shamanic healing ceremonies are emphasized.

 

Psychopharmacology

While the course aims to provide students with a background of psychopharmacology necessary to achieve clinical licensing, appropriate use of psychopharmaceuticals and possible iatrogenic outcomes due to excessive and prolonged use is analyzed. Sociopolitical factors that influence patterns of prescription psychiatric drugs will be discussed. Consideration will also be given to the use of forms of alternate and complimentary medication that entail less harmful side effects as well as psychotherapy programs that decrease lifelong dependence on pharmaceuticals. (4 units) * Highly recommended for all clinical psy licensure track students.

 

Advanced Qualitative Research

This course focuses learning and using qualitative, heuristic, phenomenological, grounded theory, and other new paradigm research models of inquiry when designing and writing research projects in the areas of psychology, and other humanities such as comparative religion and philosophy. Natural settings provide a deeper and more valid reflection of the phenomena being studied. Likewise, the researcher’s perceived experience as researcher provides valid information based upon both phenomenological and heuristic experience. Methods of subject and topic selection, conditions, data collection and interpretation, will be examined and illustrated from diverse areas. The ability to articulate the learning when communicating with other students and in completion of written assignments will be a critical element of the course.

Note that the CRP 613 course specifically instructs the student in the multi-disciplinary methods for the academic study of world religions and aspects of spirituality.

 

Topic of Special Interest: Awareness and the Afterlife

This course is an exploration of awareness and the afterlife. The course explores afterlife accounts and how they illuminate the afterlife experience, dissolve the fear of death, and consistently emphasize the importance of awareness, knowledge, and love.

 

Advance Concept in Pranic Healing  Prerequisite: *Pranic Healing

Updating

 

Topic of Special Interest: The Biofield

Living systems are complex, nonlinear, dynamical, self-organizing systems possessing innate energy fields imbued with bio-information vital to life processes.  Moreover, they continually exchange matter and energy-with-information within and across multiple levels of organization to heal, maintain themselves, and advance or evolve.  This course will provide a scientific overview of holistic biotonic principles that are central to the organism, with a focus on the bioenergy field or  biofield.  Such holistic field concepts have played central roles in the traditional worldviews and healing systems of all indigenous cultures on earth.  Both Eastern and Western biofield concepts will be covered in this course.  The biofield concepts may be essential to building an appropriate scientific foundation for energy medicine.  The world view clashes with mainstream science and medicine—as well as opportunities for reconciliation—will be explored.  The course will conclude with a review of recent progress in biofield theory and experiment, an exploration of the relationship between biofields and consciousness, and an assessment of various directions for future research.

Dissertation Topic Research

Topic of Special Interest:  Considerations on Compassion in Clinical & Integral Practice

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an opportunity to examine areas of interest in the scientific literature as a preamble to selecting a dissertation topic. The student meets regularly with faculty during this process to discuss ideas, conceptual, methodological issues, and problems connected to specific areas. A draft proposal outlining the topic and rationale will be required to be submitted as course work. (5 units)

 

Dissertation Methodology Review

This course examines methodological options appropriate to the area of research that the student has selected for the dissertation project. Student must meet regularly during the quarter to discuss appropriate investigation methods in the area that they have selected as a dissertation topic. An outline of sample selection and research design methods as well as procedures and instruments will be required as course work. (5 units)

 

Dissertation I

Dissertation I represents the student’s work up to the point of his/her committee’s acceptance of a formal dissertation proposal, comprising the first three chapters of the dissertation. This includes a review of relevant literature and statement of the problem to be investigated and a detailed methodology. At this stage, the student focuses on the pursuit of data to later provide analysis to draw conclusions or inferences. A committee of three members approved by the Program Director must formally accept the proposal to complete Dissertation I. (6 units)

 

Dissertation II

This course covers the dissertation project from the proposal to the presentation of data and the student’s successful oral defense to the committee and any required revisions. The final written document includes the first three chapters and a report of findings, a discussion of the findings of the problem investigated, also a discussion of drawbacks or limitations of the study in light of its execution and results, and pertinent suggestions for further, refined research within a five or six chapter model. At the end of this stage, the entire dissertation and its process are complete. (6 units)

 

 

 

 

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